Aeroshell grease

When it comes to liquids, it is important to understand viscosity. This is especially important when it comes to choosing a castrol distributors because the viscosity of oil is crucial in determining if you have a quality product or not. Here we create a beginner’s guide on what to know when it comes to viscosity in oil.

When speaking of engine oil, it is good to know that they are formulated oils meant to serve a certain purpose. There are generally three different types: mineral, semi-synthetic, and fully synthetic, and each level has its own number of additives. So, the quality of the engine oil or oil from a lubricant oil distributor is dependent on the state of these additives.

One of the most important requirements for high-quality oil is its viscosity. In simple terms, this means the fluid’s resistance to flow, and is dependent on different temperatures in both the cold and warm seasons. It can be tricky to understand the label as there are two numbers to understand. The first is oil with a viscosity of 0 degrees Fahrenheit that is next to a letter, W, standing for winter. The second number can go all the way to 212 degrees Fahrenheit. The higher both numbers are, the more viscosity the oil has when it is hot.

It is important to note that it is necessary to have different viscosity levels when the oil is hot and cold, as the different temperatures can cause the oil to thin or thicken as it cools. So remember, as you’ll need the oil to be both hot when your car runs but able to heat up quickly and thin out, so this number is incredibly important. As a general rule of thumb, oil that is thicker generally seals better and creates a better lubrication film between the moving parts of your engine.

There is a lot that goes into determining the viscosity of oil, so it is important to always speak to your castrol distributors if you have any questions. They will be able to recommend any specific oil for your car, from aeroshell grease to braycote products. There are many options, so don’t be afraid to ask.